Meet Our New Development and Operations Manager, Jerry Ellis!

Meet Our New Development and Operations Manager, Jerry Ellis!

"Joining the LT community has been such an honor, and it is a privilege to work for and belong to such a loving and supportive community. I am looking forward to working with fellows and assisting them with program issues, discerning for seminary, and financial planning. As the Development and Operations Manager, I take my duties very seriously and care deeply for the development and spiritual success of every fellow I come in contact with. Life Together has a great reputation, and I am happy to be part of the team and community." 

Jerry Ellis is a leader in labor economics and poverty and an award winning teacher and researcher from the University of Minnesota, where he obtained his PhD in labor economics and organizational psychology.

Navigating Transition by Jocelin Thomas

Navigating Transition by Jocelin Thomas

It's a time for transition. The smells in the Northeast are changing from smoky bonfires and the scent of freshly cut grass, to pumpkin spice in every form and the crisp aroma of autumn. For many of the Micah (first year) fellows, the transition has been from college to work life. For a few, like me, the transition has been about career change. Before joining Life Together, I worked at the Boston branch of an international public accounting firm. Quite unhappy with my job and future prospects at the firm, I decided to seek a different path. Thankfully, this brought me to Life Together and my placement site, Safe Havens Interfaith Partnership Against Domestic Violence.

September Letter from Executive Director Kelsey Rice Bogdan

September Letter from Executive Director Kelsey Rice Bogdan

Since my childhood, I’ve loved September. More than any New Year’s resolutions, the start of the academic or program year seems filled with promise: I loved getting that fresh syllabus on the first day of class in college, anticipating all the new worlds to which I would be introduced and the stimulating class discussions we would have about them. On that day, the long hours writing papers and the tough exams weren’t on the horizon… even if the syllabus clearly spelled out that they were coming.

Meet the 2017-2018 Emmaus Team!

We are so excited to introduce our next group of Emmaus (second-year) fellows! In their Emmaus year, fellows dive into a year of leadership development. They take on servant leadership roles during Friday trainings and other staff support responsibilities, all while continuing to serve at a church or non-profit site. Let's meet our new team!

June Letter from Director of Recruitment and Development Rebecca Behizadeh

June Letter from Director of Recruitment and Development Rebecca Behizadeh

On Friday night May 12th, in the midst of typical Boston spring weather (read: rainy and cold), I gathered with the Greater Boston Zen Center’s newly created Racial & Social Justice working group in Cambridge. We were, organizationally, babies: it was our third-ever meeting. And yet, we were already humming. The hospitality team had provided pizza; I had a butcher-paper agenda on the wall; we checked in; someone volunteered to be time-keeper; a member of the group shared her public narrative, and others responded with words of resonance; we went through a draft of the shared purpose; we silently journaled; we shared in groups of 3, then reported out; we reviewed roles; we had an evaluation at the end, complete with pluses, deltas and shout-outs. For those who aren’t familiar, all of these activities are classic Life Together.

Re-membering the Whole Self by Katie Ernst

 Re-membering the Whole Self by Katie Ernst

When I came to Life Together I was wrestling with the multiple parts of myself-- how to integrate my emotions, intellect and body. My earlier years in the Church required me to sever these parts of me into nice little boxes-- some safe, some not so safe. First box was emotions, to trust my heart and the Holy Spirit. I learned that God was most present when I emoted out to Him (and make no mistakes it was a Him). However, as soon as I questioned or began to have criticism or doubt, the emotional box unraveled.

Teaching with a Snap!: A Lesson on the Pursuit of Justice, as Taught by My Students by MarQuis L. Chappell

Teaching with a Snap!: A Lesson on the Pursuit of Justice, as Taught by My Students by MarQuis L. Chappell

During a whole-group discussion in my 8th grade Reading class as we were discussing Romantic poetry’s central themes of God and nature, one of my students - who is certainly regarded as fearless and outspoken- asked with unprecedented fervor, “Mr., if God is real, and God controls nature, then why haven’t the people in Flint, Michigan had clean water in over two years? Why wouldn’t God fix the water so His people can survive?” As a teacher, a major portion of my job requires me to make judgments and formulate responses in a matter of seconds, without much time for planning or extensive pondering. Having been trained as a teacher during my undergraduate career, having worked in a number of educational settings prior to my time at Esperanza, and spending twelve-plus hours at Esperanza each day has resulted in me developing a deep confidence in my ability to formulate responses with little delay. In that moment, however, I could not respond. I had no idea what to say. And still do not.

 

 

May Letter from Executive Director Kelsey Rice Bogdan

May Letter from Executive Director Kelsey Rice Bogdan

I remember my first Love Matters, two days before I started working at Life Together. I remember the warmth and laughter that greeted me as I found my way downstairs, the familiar faces of Life Together friends I hadn’t seen in a long time. I remember nervously meeting the community of fellows I had been called to serve. And I remember the stories of fellows, challenging me to live into my deepest values, inspiring me to seek transformation and new life. Above all else, it is the stories I hear at Love Matters that stay with me, that help me lean into this work alongside our community.

Dancing with Paradox by Amy Melena

Dancing with Paradox by Amy Melena

It is 7:30am and I climb out of bed after double-snoozing my alarm, I haven’t quite mastered becoming a morning person just yet. Dream walking downstairs, I find myself in the meditation room of 40 Prescott. For the next half hour or so, my three housemates and I will sit in contemplative practice as bold rays of sunshine contrast the small flicker of candlelight flames on the ground around us. It is in this silence that I’ll hear God’s quiet movement of paradoxical clarity move with tip-toed steps. It is the friend I have been waiting for.

 

April Letter from Executive Director Kelsey Rice Bogdan

April Letter from Executive Director Kelsey Rice Bogdan

I’ll start with a confession about my year as a Life Together fellow: I never lived in intentional community. No community nights, no shared food budget, no Friday Prayer Partners, no tense house conflicts. At the end of a long day at my site placement, or a particularly intense Friday training, I would go home to peace, quiet, and the sympathetic ear of my partner. There were days when I counted myself lucky not to be sharing a house with six strangers.

The Teachings of Jesus by Greg Baker

The Teachings of Jesus by Greg Baker

My worksite is completely secular. But I am a self-proclaimed “church nerd,” and so I do a lot of thinking about the Church. In this tumultuous time in our society, I often wonder what role the institutional Church plays in our culture. In my generation, Church isn’t “cool.” To be religious is to be outside the norm, separate from what your peers do or stand for.

March Letter from Executive Director Kelsey Rice Bogdan

March Letter from Executive Director Kelsey Rice Bogdan

I spent part of last Sunday in a little Western Massachusetts town called Shelburne Falls, where my family and I had come to see the waterfall for which the town was named. Warm temperatures had caused the mountain snow to melt, and the Deerfield River plunged over boulders and through glacial potholes in a torrent of foaming, muddy brown-and-white water. Its power evoked the words of the prophet Amos, where “justice roll[s] down like waters, and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream.”
 

Our Future Leaders by Kiera Powers

Our Future Leaders by Kiera Powers

I have been lucky enough to be accepted to this program and placed at the Esperanza Academy in Lawrence to be a full time teacher, coach, advisor, mentor, support system, and most importantly, friend. In other words, I have essentially adopted 60 new daughters. I use that metaphor because in the few short months that I’ve been here, they have already lodged themselves right into one of the most sincere parts of my heart. 

February Letter from Executive Director Kelsey Rice Bogdan

February Letter from Executive Director Kelsey Rice Bogdan

When I think of contemplative practice here at Life Together, I often imagine spacious silence. So our January Third Friday training around contemplative practice, held this year as our nation inaugurated its 45th president, became an experiment of sorts. The trainers that day, LT alumni Lydia Strand and Yani Burgos, decided to focus our contemplation on the forgotten spiritual practice of lament.

Catholic by Blood, Buddhist by Fire by Matt Gesicki

Catholic by Blood, Buddhist by Fire by Matt Gesicki

I was baptized Catholic by blood, Buddhist by fire. In the summer of 2015—immediately following my time with Life Together—I traveled to China to participate in the Woodenfish Humanistic Buddhist Monastic Life Program, a month-long immersive Buddhist studies/monastic living program for Western students led by a Taiwanese Buddhist nun. After a month of a shaved head, white robes, and meditation and tai chi daily, we concluded our sojourn with a silent retreat at a nunnery on Mount Wutai, one of China’s four sacred Buddhist mountains. After an ascent of 108 full-body prostrations in a climb to one of Wutai’s plateaus, bowing into stones gritted with incense from the fires of offerings, I participated in the ritual of taking refuge—the Buddhist equivalent to baptism. Among the fires of the shrines and the murmured sutras of old pilgrims, I took refuge in the Three Jewels of the Buddha (the teacher), the Dharma (the teachings), and the Sangha (the community).

Love's Echo: Reflecting on the Sounds that Transform Us and Bring Us Home by Savannah Hauge

Love's Echo: Reflecting on the Sounds that Transform Us and Bring Us Home by Savannah Hauge

Hello, allow me to introduce myself. My name is Savannah and I grew up to crickets louder than cars outside my window, the reggeatón at birthday parties hosted by Mexican families my mom knew that left my ears deafly ringing, the St. Olaf choir throwing alleluias to the heavens through my grandma’s Bose speaker at Christmastime, my dad picking out Aerosmith melodies on his guitar come evening, eyes closed, leaning back. When I was mulling over what to write for this piece, there were so many strands of my life here that I wanted to talk about. So, instead of choosing one, I’ve woven them into their own soundscape. Take a listen:

January Letter from Executive Director Kelsey Rice Bogdan

January Letter from Executive Director Kelsey Rice Bogdan

The day, January 6, 2015, had started as do many January days in Boston: bitterly cold, as I walked through the windy corridors of the Back Bay to my office. It was the Christian Feast of the Epiphany, but otherwise unexceptional. And then a random friend called to ask for a meeting later in the day. “Are you in the neighborhood?” I asked. “No, but I can come from Needham if you’re available.” Intrigued by her sense of urgency, I said yes.